Top 20 Foods To Try In Guangzhou, China

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People in Guangzhou are passionate about cuisine and know a lot about it. Guangdong Cuisine, a typical subbranch of Cantonese cuisine, is the name given to the local cuisine. The abundant natural resources in Guangdong provide the raw materials for Guangdong cuisine. The four-legged table is the one thing they seem to avoid gnawing on. Cantonians place a high value on preserving food’s inherent flavor and quality.

1. White Cut Chicken

Cantonese cuisine’s White Cut Chicken is a simple but flavorful recipe. The chicken is boiled for fifteen minutes without additional spices or tastes. Choosing a local, organic chicken for its distinct flavor is essential. After it’s cooked, peanut oil, ginger, and scallions are added to enhance the taste. The tough skin is where the majority of the flavor is concentrated.

1. White Cut Chicken

2. Cantonese Hot Pot

The northern Chinese hot pot is similar to the Cantonese version. This Canton-style Han meal contains only the finest ingredients. Soup and an assortment of fresh seafood and game meat are included in this hot pot. The hot pot is served with a’shacha’ sauce, made locally.

2. Cantonese Hot Pot

3. Dragon Fighting The Tiger

It’s the scariest Guangzhou delicacy on this plate (for foreigners, at least). The dish is dubbed “Dragon Fighting the Tiger” because it contains snake and wild cat meat, giving it the appearance of a dragon and a tiger. Adding “phoenix” flavor to the recipe is as simple as using black chicken. All the components are simmered in a soup with winter mushrooms and dates.

3. Dragon Fighting the Tiger

4. Wonton Noodles

The soup is frequently served with noodles (mien, or “mee-ehn,” in Chinese) and wonton dumplings, despite its name. In Guangdong, shrimp wonton and 30 percent minced pork are traditional ingredients in wonton fillings. Al dente (undercooked) and vermicelli-thin are the conventional characteristics of the noodles. Bak Choi is a common ingredient in the soup, seasoned with salt and pepper.

4. Wonton Noodles

5. Siu Mai – Shaomai 

The Har Gao dumplings are an excellent match for these. This succulent pork and shrimp dumplings are stuffed with bamboo shoots, water chestnuts, or dehydrated shiitake mushrooms.

5. SIU MAI SHAOMAI

6. Roast Suckling Pig

Anyone who has seen a Chinese feast in a movie is likely to have seen this dish: a whole roast pig cooked to a golden brown, usually with an apple in its mouth. Named for the fact that it’s usually just 2-6 weeks old, the Suckling Pig is often nursed on its mother’s milk. Softer and more tender meat can be found in young pigs. For large gatherings and festivities, suckling pig is a popular dish. It is common to see suckling pigs served at wedding receptions, holiday feasts, and the first month anniversary of a baby.

6. Roast Suckling Pig

7. Boat Congee

To make the ‘boat congee,’ you’ll need fresh shrimp and fish fillet, shallot and egg slices, jellyfish, peanuts, and fried pig skin. Boiling is the most common way of cooking. According to mythology, authentic boat porridge is said to be produced and eaten aboard a boat floating down the river.

7. Boat congee

8. Pidan Shourou Zhou

Only the most daring diners should attempt this dish! In most dim sum restaurants, you may order this rice porridge and receive a taste of a century egg without having to eat a whole egg yourself. You’ll either love or despise the flavor of this porridge, which contains little chunks of fermented, powerful century egg.

8. PIDAN SHOUROU ZHOU

9. Sweet And Sour Pork

It was in the 18th century that a wealthy family in Guangzhou began serving sweet and sour pork prepared in the style of Guangzhou. Pork is the main ingredient in the popular American-Chinese dish chop suey. The pork is wok-fried in an aromatic corn flour batter seasoned with ketchup and soy sauce in this dish. Other popular ingredients in this meal include garlic and bamboo shoots.

9. Sweet and Sour Pork

10. Taiye Chicken

For Taiye Chicken, the name is derived from the mayor of an ancient Guangzhou city in China during the Qing Dynasty. He supposedly devised the dish after he left the government. The chicken is smoked with black tea leaves and honey after being boiled in a specific salty soup until it is 90% cooked. Sliced and coated in a unique soup with a love for added salt and sweetness, it’s ready to serve.

10. Taiye Chicken

11. Chow Ho Fun

It is common in Guangdong to find numerous Cantonese rice noodles, often known as beef noodles or chow fun, a mainstay of Guangdong cuisine. Served with ho fun (wide noodles), bean sprouts, and occasionally greens, this meal is created with sliced beef.

11. Chow Ho Fun

12. Pork Tripe Stew Chicken

In the Guangdong Hakka region, this soup is served as an appetizer and a typical local cuisine before a meal. With a sip, you know it’s excellent for you, thanks to the aroma of pepper and the taste. Powerful aromas emanate from the milky white soup.

12. Pork tripe stew chicken

13. Yum Cha

A traditional Cantonese pastime, yum cha, or morning tea, is not merely food. It is customary to offer Yum Cha alongside Dim Sum as part of the traditional tea ritual. It is possible to serve a variety of teas, such as Oolong, Tieguanyin, and Pu’er as Yum Cha. At least once in Guangzhou is a must for visitors to the Guangdong capital, Canton, to participate in this renowned morning snack tradition.

13. Yum Cha

14. Egg Tarts 

There is a strong preference for egg tarts in the area. Most bakeries in Guangdong, which includes Hong Kong and the surrounding provinces of Guangxi and Zhejiang, sell egg tarts. Egg and sugar are combined in a pie-like crust to form a snack nearly the size of a bite. This is a must-try if you’re ever in Guangdong.

14. Egg Tarts

15. Hefen Noodles 

Cantonese cuisine relies heavily on the hefen, a wide rice noodle that originated in Tianhe, Guangzhou. This noodle has a distinctive quality: it’s incredibly slippery. Various preparations, such as stir-frying, steaming, and serving with soy sauce, can be used to make these chewy and elastic noodles.

15. Hefen Noodles

16. Baiyun Trotter

Many restaurants in Guangzhou serve the popular dish, Baiyun Trotter. The trotters are seasoned and served on a cold plate with a side of cold salad and well-boiled potatoes. Baiyun Spring water is supposed to have been used to make the “Baiyun Trotter.” As a result, it is known as Baiyun.

16. Baiyun Trotter

17. Fried Rice Noodles With Sliced Beef

This classic dish is a must-have on the menus in both Cantonese and tea establishments because of its renown in Cantonese cooking. Sprouts, rice noodles, and meat are all fried together in this dish. The first step is to cook the steak to medium-rare. The sprouts and onions should then be sautéed in more oil. Soy sauce and boiling oil are used to fast, cook, the rice rolls. Finally, add in the meat.

17. Fried rice noodles with sliced beef

18. Double-Skin Milk (Shuang Pi Nai) 

A popular street meal in Guangzhou is also known as Simmered Milk. It appears to be comprised of egg white and milk and is a semisolid white color. Double-Skin Milk gets its name because it has two thin layers: one on top and one at the bottom. It has a mild, sweet flavor. Furthermore, it’s loaded with nutrients. The specialty of the Nanxin Milk Store on Xia Jiu Road is Nanxin Shuang Pi Nai.

18. Double Skin Milk Shuang Pi Nai

19. Cantonese Congee

To make congee (pronounced Kahn-jee), rice is cooked in water until it dissolves and then strained. Light, moderate and versatile in its pairings with other foods, it’s often served during breakfast. There are two ways to eat congee: as a stand-alone dish or as part of a congee meal. It’s also common to add dace (a local river fish) and hundred-year eggs as well as a variety of other ingredients and side dishes such as duck eggs and salt. The flavor is usually delicious if the congee isn’t light and bland.

19. Cantonese Congee

20. Char Siu

Char Siu is a Cantonese form of grilled pork that has been popular since the earliest days of the region’s history. Barbecued meat may have been around as long as fire itself. Siu means to burn or roast in Cantonese, while char means to fork in Cantonese. Pork skewers seasoned with herbs and spices are cooked in a covered oven or on fire.

20. Char Siu